Recipe: Three-ingredient, no-churn ice cream

“When I’m not longer rapping, I want to open up an ice cream parlor and call myself Scoop Dogg.” – Snoop Dogg.

You should always have ice cream in your freezer. Always.

I mean, can you imagine if you had an ice cream emergency only to discover you were lacking? What if, for example, you went through a stereotypical American sitcom heartbreak. How could you adequately console yourself without a tub of the stuff?

What about all those times you whip up bitter chocolate soufflés and fondants post-work and pre-bed and don’t have anything sweet to serve alongside them? Well, then my friend you’d have egg on your face wouldn’t you.

“Ice-cream is exquisite – what a pity it isn’t illegal.”  -Voltaire

And don’t even think about hosting a slumber party/girl’s night in/movie evening/Saturday night pity party for one without it. The thought is madness. MADNESS I tell you!

Ok, so, ice cream isn’t exactly one of life’s necessities, but it is one of life’s loveliest frivolities, and having a creamy slab of the homemade stuff on hand is a wonderful thing.

I don’t have an ice cream maker or the patience to stir my mix every few hours to prevent ice crystals forming, so this recipe, which is barely adapted from Mary Berry’s original no-churn offering, is a life saver.

With only three base ingredients, it’s so stupidly easy to make, you should try making a couple of batches at a time and adding a few different flavours and textures.

I’ve noted my two very favourite variations on classic vanilla: sticky, crunchy honeycomb and swirls or tangy lemon curd.

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INGREDIENTS

4 eggs, separated
100g caster sugar
300ml double cream

METHOD

  • Line a metal loaf tin with greaseproof paper or dig out a plastic tub to store your ice cream.
  • Whisk the egg whites in a large bowl with an electric beater until they form stiff peaks.
  • Slowly whisk in the caster sugar until the egg whites are stiff and glossy.
  • In a separate bowl, whisk the double cream until soft peaks form when the whisk is removed.
  • Gently fold the cream and beaten egg yolks into the meringue mixture until combined.
  • Pour into your prepared container and freeze overnight before eating.

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Honeycomb ice cream

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INGREDIENTS 

a little vegetable oil, for greasing
200g golden caster sugar
4 tbsp honey
2 tsp bicarbonate of soda

METHOD

  • Lightly grease a big sheet of greaseproof paper and place it over a large wooden board or heat-proof surface.
  • Pour the golden caster sugar and honey into a heavy-based saucepan and stir over a gentle heat until the sugar has dissolved. Once melted, turn up the heat and let it simmer until it’s turned into a deep, oozing caramel.
  • Take of the heat and quickly whisk in the bicarbonate of soda, mixing furiously. It will start to foam and froth up. Pour the marshmallowy mixture over the greased paper and leave to cool and harden for around 45 minutes.
  • When it’s cool, cover with another layer of paper and smash into shards with a rolling pin. Sprinkle on the base of your ice cream tin in layers, covering each layer with a thick slop of ice cream so it’s evenly spread. Finish with some larger shards on top before freezing.

Lemon curd ice cream

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INGREDIENTS

1 jar of homemade lemon curd

METHOD

  • Fill your ice cream container a quarter full of the ice cream mixture. Dollop over five or six teaspoons of the lemon curd, gently swirling with the tip of a knife.
  • Repeat until the container is full and finish with a final swirl on top before freezing.
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Weekend Bake: A Sundae for a Sunny Sunday with Movenpick Ice Cream

When I was little my parents used to take me and my brother to a little restaurant in a converted watermill called Bluebeckers. I loved it there. It was my favourite restaurant and always on the tip of my tongue when my parents asked if we wanted to eat anywhere special. Through my nine-year-old, rose-tinted view, the food here was magical. If we were good and minded our manners, there wasn’t a limit to the greasy and sugary delights we were allowed to shovel in on these special occasions.

I remember beaming from ear to ear, straining upwards in my seat, back so ram-rod straight and cutlery so carefully held and deployed that I must have looked like a marionette as plates of steak and juicy burgers dribbling cheese over thick-cut chips were placed in front of me. I remember the violent green of the ‘Vampire Float’ that came topped with a bobbing and writhing puff of vanilla ice cream, slowly dissolving into the fizzing, toxic spillage soft drink. I remember my brother rowing me out onto the little lake they had and smacking me in the face with an oar and the chocolate fudge cake my mother fed me to make the pain of my fat lip go away. But mostly I remember the hot fudge Sundaes they served there.

Before Bluebeckers I don’t think I had ever had a proper Sundae. I’d run for Fabs and Zaps from the ice cream vans that pootled along our road; I’d wolfed down globes of Gino Ginelli’s fudge swirl when I was staying at my grandparents in Dorset and I distinctly remember my first magnum ice cream and the dangerous crack of chocolate that thundered from that first, wondrous bite.

These Sundaes where the real deal: tall glasses with chocolate and vanilla ice cream layered with fudge bites and popping candy that arrived with a jug of warm, fudge sauce. Bluebeckers might be long gone now but I still dream about their baby jugs of fudge sauce.

So when I was asked by luxury Swiss ice cream brand Mövenpick if I wanted to create an original Sundae recipe using their premium range of ice creams, I was elated. And it would mean that I was in for a chance of winning a two-hour master class with The Langham’s head pastry chef, Cherish Finden, as well as afternoon tea in The Palm Court. I might not be able to have another Bluebeckers Sundae but I could still make my own version.

How can you possibly improve on such a winning combination as ice cream, fruit and sauce? The only thing I could think of was to make it more grown up and what do grown ups like? All together now, booze! Well, at least this grown up does and there’s nothing more that I love on balmy, summer days like this than a glass of Pimms, full of chopped fruit and clinking with ice.

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So here it is, my Pimms Sundae where orange Pimms jelly and lemon syrup infused shortcake meets candied cucumber, crystallised mint and as much creamy Mövenpick ice cream as I can squeeze into a glass, all topped with lashings of Pimms and strawberry syrup.

It’s grown up jelly and ice cream with a few little treats and surprises layered in, because everyone knows that half the fun of a Sundae is eating your way down through each layer until you manage to excavate something new.

It may seem like there are a lot of different components to this, but most of them can be made in advance. You can store the cucumber thins and mint leaves in tupperware for a few days until you’re ready to use them and the jelly, syrup and shortcake can be made the night before, meaning that come serving time the only thing you have to worry about is how much you can shove into a Sundae glass without looking like Bruce Bogtrotter on a mission.

for the orange Pimms jelly

6 ripe oranges
1 lemon
300ml Pimms
2 tbsp caster sugar (to taste)
10 strawberries, quartered
3 sheets of leaf gelatine

These jellies pack a hugely alcoholic punch and aren’t overly sweet, which make them the perfect accompaniment to the rest of the sugary ingredients in this Sundae recipe. Most Pimms jelly recipes use pre-made jelly cubes or lemonade, but this easy-peasy one just uses fruit juice and gelatine to set these bronze-coloured wobbly beauties.

You’ll need to start by making the jelly as this can take up to five hours to set in the fridge.

  • Slice and squeeze the oranges, making sure you get all the juice out and add the juice from the lemon – I like to warm citrus fruits in the microwave for 30 seconds or leave them in the sun for an hour or so to get the juice flowing.
  • Pass the juice through a sieve to get rid of most of the pulp and any stray seeds you may have squeezed into the mix and add the 300ml of Pimms – you should have about 600ml of liquid now.
  • Soak the gelatine sheets in cold water until they’re soft while you warm half of the juice mixture in a saucepan on the stove. When it’s warm, squeeze the excess water from the gelatine and stir into the warmed juice.
  • When it’s dissolved, pour in the remaining cold juice and mix. Test to see if you need to add any caster sugar to make the mix sweeter (I like to keep mine quite sharp to offset the sweetness of the Sundae) before pouring into glasses or containers and adding the fresh slices of strawberry. Refrigerate for four-five hours until set.

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for the candied cucumber

As I dreamed this Sundae up, I wondered if anyone had ever made a sweet cucumber garnish. While cucumbers are usually chucked into salads or gin and tonics or pickled and brined, you don’t see too many cucumbers being turned into sweets, which is odd when you consider how naturally sweet a vegetable they really are. A quick internet search revealed one recipe for candied cucumbers using the exact method I was planning to. So I have to dedicate these toffee-like, floral cucumber tuiles to Cluracon from The Indestructables. 

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200g caster sugar
half a cucumber
half a bunch of mint
200ml water

  • Wash your half a cucumber under cold water before slicing thin discs using a serrated knife – the thinner the better as they will crisp up in the oven as opposed to staying quite water-logged and chewy.
  • Roughly chop the mint leaves from your half bunch.
  • Heat the sugar and the water on a low heat until the sugar has dissolved and a clear syrup has formed. Add the mint leaves and give it a stir before throwing in the delicate little cucumber thins.
  • Leave these to poach for about 20 minutes while you heat the oven to a very low 90 degrees and line a baking tray with parchment.
  • After 20 minutes, carefully lever out the soft cucumber slices – which will now look a little bit like stained glass windows – and spread them on the baking tray.

Keep the poaching syrup from the cucumbers as a glug of this minty, fresh syrup makes an AMAZING addition to gin and tonics, glasses of prosecco or simple cloudy lemonade.

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  • Pop into the oven for around two hours to slowly dry out and crisp up as the residual sugar syrup dissolves.
  • Be careful when you’re pulling these from the baking parchment as they can be really sticky and break easily. I like to remove them when they are still warm as they’re a little more pliable.

for the crystallised mint 

the leaves from half a bunch of mint
100g caster sugar
1 egg white

Crystallised mint leaves as easy peasy to make and use the same technique as making edible flower decorations.

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  • Just rinse the mint leaves and dab dry on kitchen towel before brushing them with egg white and wiping them through a bowl of caster sugar on both sides.
  • Lay them on a lined baking tray and you can put them in the oven alongside the cucumbers to dry so that the sugar can crystallise.
  • Take them out after about and hour and carefully peel them from the parchment and you’ll have delicate little fronds of iced mint – so easy but so effective for drink or cake decorations!

for the lemon syrup shortbread

100g softened butter
50g caster sugar
125g plain flour
1 lemon
1 tbsp caster sugar

  • Beat the butter and sugar into submission with a wooden spoon before mixing through the flour. You can use an electric mixer but it’s really easy to overwork this dough, making the resulting biscuits harder and less crumbly.
  • Gather the dough into a ball and roll out to about 1cm deep before cutting out rounds. I used three different sized cutters for this recipe  to follow the trumpet shape of the Sundae glass.

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  • Bake for ten minutes or until just golden at 190 degrees and leave to cool. If the biscuits have spread during cooking you can cut them down to size again with the cutters while they’re still hot and soft.

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  • Squeeze the juice of a lemon with a tbsp caster sugar into a saucepan and heat until the sugar has dissolved. Add more sugar if it’s too tart and drizzle over the biscuits when they’re warm from the oven.

for the strawberry Pimms syrup

A punnet of ripe, British strawberries
100ml Pimms
100ml water
100g caster sugar

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  • This syrup is a great way of getting rid of overripe strawberries and goes fantastically on its own with ice cream or shortbread biscuits.
  • Hull and quarter the strawberries before adding them to a heavy bottomed saucepan along with the water, Pimms and sugar.
  • Let the mix come to the boil before leaving to simmer gently for around 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. When the mixture has reduced to a deep, rich, ruby coloured syrup with chances of strawberries still floating then you’re there – don’t leave it any longer than 20 minutes though or you’ll end up with jam!

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Now you’re finally ready to assemble your Sundae. Start with a layer of jelly in the bottom before adding the smallest biscuit and a generous scoop of Mövenpick vanilla ice cream. Top with a splodge of strawberry sauce and a few cucumber rounds before repeating until you’ve created a towering, boozy ice cream mountain of lusciousness.

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I used a scoop of Mövenpick‘s deliciously decadent white chocolate ice cream in between the two vanilla scoops for an extra sweet treat – heavenly!

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Mövenpick is available for purchase in Ocado, priced at £8.49 for a 900ml tub. For more information, visit www.moevenpick-icecream.co.uk